Graceville Flood House

01. Brief

This house served as a lesson to how we can rebuild in at-risk areas in a way which preserves the scale and amenity of Brisbane’s suburbs, but ensures that property and people are protected ahead of the next event.

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02. Climate Adaptation & Flooding

Nothing was left of the house after Australia’s most expensive natural disaster.

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03. Construction

The clients were forced to raise their house over 3 metres to comply with new temporary planning instruments, which requires habitable floor levels exist above the flood-line.

Prominent features of this building include the use of flood-resilient render over concrete block, which proved an affordable flood-friendly solution for the lower floor. The sloping ground level was raised over 1 metre in some areas, to address issues of height and scale particularly on the street front. Flood-proof joinery was installed on the ground level. Hardwood timber was used for screens and the stair, which will be more resistant to future flood water.

04. Resilient Strategies

In addition to elevation, the lower level of the house is designed to be completley inundated.

Flood-proof joinery was installed on the ground level. Hardwood timber was used for screens and the stair, which will be more resistant to future flood water. Polished concrete and water-proof rendered block walls are simple materials but very effective in flood resilient design. By using large openings and permeable screens, water can flow through without creating structural damage, and allow easy cleaning after future flood waters recede.

05. Outcome

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06. Results

Proving that flood resilient design does have an impact, Suncorp Insurance lowered the property’s premium by over 40%